bromton1

Written By , 5 days ago

Our very own Stig – aka Corke Wallis designer, Andy – reflects on the challenges and creative thinking behind our successful Black Edition campaign video for Brompton:

andy

The branding challenge for this campaign was… creating something that was very different to what Brompton had done before and would create a buzz across social platforms. At the same time, we needed to capture what makes a Brompton unique and adaptable, and how the bike is perfect for the city, in line with their Made for cities positioning.

brompton4 (1)

We approached it by… firstly, shooting in a studio, allowing us more creative freedom to focus on the craftsmanship of the bikes rather than the rider. Collaborating with super-talented film team, Oldie, we decided a futuristic space aesthetic would really suit the bikes – objects appearing through darkness, locking perfectly into position, really showing the engineering that has gone into the design. We looked at sci-fi films and imagery as an inspiration – particularly Ridley Scott’s Alien. The combination of sound and imagery really helped create an atmosphere and engage the viewer.

brompton2 (1)

There were a few logistical challenges on the day… We used rollers for the filming so the bike remained in the same place for filming – they were pretty intimidating to begin with! Particularly with LED lights rotating 3 inches from my face, photography lights flashes sporadically going off, smoke machines and a film crew moving around me to get the best shots… We needed to ensure city elements were captured so Oldie made lighting rigs that would rotate, shining light through Prisms which created some beautiful effects. This gave the sense of movement we were after.

Brompton 1

We chose to work with Oldie because… they are excellent at what they do and open to ideas. They really know how to get the best from a shot and have the editing skills to match. They also know how to work to great effect within a very tight deadline!

Creating this campaign was exciting because… this approach and execution was very different to anything Brompton had produced before. And it’s always great working with a top-class creative team (Oldie and photographer Anna Batchelor) to achieve the aesthetic.

It was a success because… Brompton trusted us to push their brand in a new direction. This really paid off, with coverage from specialist bike blogs and publications all over the world. The Black Edition video was Brompton’s most shared piece of content to date.

brompton3 (1)

More entries in

  1. Behind the brand

Discussion

No comments so far

Connected_Brompton (1)

Written By , 5 days ago

Brompton’s Made for cities positioning places the brand in the front line of city transport solutions. Mobility in modern, densely populated, resource-hungry cities is a huge issue. It can only be addressed by solving problems in an imaginative, connected way.

Made for cities certainly works for Brompton now. It places the bikes into the context in which they work best – big cities with lots of commuters battling to get to work and residents with limited space in their expensive homes.

80% of the earth’s population will soon live in a city, so Made for cities isn’t limiting in terms of audience size – big, developed cities all over the world have similar problems to solve (which a Brompton does brilliantly).

But Made for cities sets Brompton up for a much bigger story. No one brand or organization will be able to solve the complex urban problems we will increasingly face – or exploit all the opportunities. Brands who understand how to remain relevant in the transport marketplace accept that they can’t just be part of the problem anymore – they have to be part of the solution. The ones that succeed in their field will be those that are connected and provide holistic, joined up solutions. A holistic answer to city movement means affordability, autonomy and connectivity; access, parking, security, environmental impact are key – as well as style, safety, sexiness and freedom (the old criteria).

BMW are investors in parking app, JustPark. Ford recently announced a folding bike so that you can park and ride. Uber have exploded as a business by understanding the lifestyles or urban passengers and providing innovative additional services around their core service – mini cabs.

Those who have their ears to the ground will know that Brompton is developing the eBrompton, a bike with an electric motor that will be able to tell when you are exerting more energy – uphill or into a strong headwind – and assist you. You won’t get all sweaty but can still enjoy the freedom and compactness of a bike and get some cardio. And with that motor comes data.

Connect the bike to the “Internet of things” and you have a very powerful urban mobility resource. A connected ‘smart bike’ will be able to improve health, congestion, pollution, safety and be a mobile “loyalty card”.

Strava, Fitbit and Nike+ have already shown how useful personal data can be for fitness. By adding sensors to a bike that can detect pollution you provide an additional layer of health benefit (and, for the wider city population, a fantastically accurate real time monitor of air conditions). A smart bike will be a able to warn a lorry or bus when it is too close, alerting cyclist and driver – the cyclist through a vibrating handle, the driver through a proximity alarm. And a café on route will know that you cycle past every day. Maybe you could let it know that you are on a diet or in training – so that it can prepare appropriate breakfasts (when it knows you are 7 minutes away) with the requisite personalized offers.

Brompton’s folding bikes are a very neat solution to an urban problem of its day: space. The high quality of its product has built trust and loyalty amongst Brompton’s audience. Its Made for cities positioning stands the brand in very good stead for the connected future.

 

 

More entries in

  1. Brand positioning

Discussion

No comments so far

Written By , 101 days ago

We grilled our Senior Brand & Digital Strategy Designer, Nicola, about the challenges and inspiration behind the rebrand….

BW_TimeOut

The challenge with this project was… defining a relatively new sector to a traditional financial investment demographic. Continue Reading …

More entries in

  1. Behind the brand
  2. Branding

Discussion

No comments so far

Written By , 108 days ago

Talking about the balance between Art and Science in marketing is a bit like the perennial nature vs. nurture argument. The discussion rumbles on – It’s all about ideas. No! It’s about evidence… but there is no single, simple proof which can settle the thing. It’s chicken and egg.

At the moment, the power is shifting towards science. Every year, technology provides access to more data and processing power, bringing analytical, accounting skills into greater prominence. The title ‘Data Scientist’ is in vogue.

Data analysis should be ‘scientific’, but labelling its practitioners as scientists is something like over-claim.

We have been working for the past year with Harwell, the UK’s largest Big Science campus, where significant academic research into nano-technology, space exploration, particle physics, genetics and many other areas is happening every day.

This is proper science. Not (warning, impending prejudice alert) hipster coders with fixies and fair-isle sweaters cutting and pasting html somewhere near Old Street.

The serious academic science research at Harwell matters. It matters for the economy and more broadly for society. According to the World Bank’s latest figures (for 2013) the UK has the 18th highest rate of GDP (1.72%) invested in research and development, but the 3rd largest economic contribution from IP (receipts from charges for the use of intellectual property), of nearly $13 billion behind the USA and Japan.

That’s wealth, but health is also a big part of the Harwell and UK scientific research story. At Harwell, phenotyping research at MRC is taking us towards a detailed understanding of our individual disease susceptibility, a potentially revolutionary development in healthcare.

British science is a compelling story and a vital economic contributor, so why does Harwell need Corke Wallis’s help? Because Harwell is not as famous as it should be. There’s a job to be done branding science.

This lack of fame is a problem, because academic science needs to work more closely with industry and private capital. Government cannot afford to fund science unaided – at least not in Europe or the USA.

So industrial tenants must be attracted to Harwell to bring a new, more modern balance to the site, where academic research, entrepreneurial science-based start-ups and industrial R&D can thrive synergistically. This mix will be attractive to both Venture and Government capital.

Our new identity for Harwell is a step towards this transformation.

—–

Reference:

1. Economic Times, “Data scientist among the sexiest jobs of the century

More entries in

  1. Branding

Discussion

No comments so far

Written By , 121 days ago

I’ve been keenly watching out for the hot new gadgets that are emerging from CES.

One that jumped out at me in an alarming way was Welcome, by NetAtmo.

I’m a parent and this makes me ill. NetAtmo is a camera that recognises your loved ones and sends you messages via the web to your smartphone. Stuff like ’Polly and Molly are home’. It also recognises strangers and sends you messages like ’stranger in the house’ which could be a delivery guy or a sex pervert. Which of course you won’t know until you desperately call home. From the middle of a meeting. Or while you are on a train with intermittent service. This would drive me mad.

Please please don’t let this be the future. Where we see all the danger, everywhere, all the time. I’m off to buy a drone.

More entries in

  1. Technology

Discussion

No comments so far

Written By , 131 days ago

Most of you will have run across William Gibson’s famous saying “The future is already here – it’s just not evenly distributed”. It came to mind again reading the reports from this year’s CES.

This time last year I wrote a post titled 2014, the wearable year?. Reading the buzz from CES 2015, It seems that this coming year might just be the wearable year too. Continue Reading …

More entries in

  1. Strategy & engagement

Discussion

No comments so far

Written By , 282 days ago

This article is based on a talk given to the Future Media team at the BBC in May 2014.

———-

In April this year, Charlotte Higgins wrote two essays for the Guardian about the past and future role of the BBC. Early in the first piece, she identified Google and Amazon as the BBC’s true competition.

I’ve spent years observing, spending money with and thinking about these new giants of the digital world. Continue Reading …

More entries in

  1. Uncategorized

Discussion

No comments so far

Written By , 443 days ago

Michael Wallis was asked to create a poster for Earth Hour, the world’s largest mass participation event yet. Earth Hour is an annual Switch Off that focuses the world’s attention on our planet. Each poster focuses on a particular carbon-reducing action – walk more, eat less red meat, reduce consumption and so on. Michael chose ‘Unplug’ with a Terminator-inspired solution.

Each poster will be distributed to 50m people daily throughout the WWF and Do The Green Thing online community. Other participating designers and artists include:

David Shrigley
Neville Brody
Patrick Cox
Sir Paul Smith
Sir Quentin Blake

More entries in

  1. After School Club

Discussion

No comments so far

Written By , 495 days ago

Reading the coverage from CES in Las Vegas last week, there seems to be broad agreement that Wearables will be the stand-out tech trend in 2014.

But what genuinely breakthrough products and technology were showcased at CES, and which, if any, might be expected to gain widespread consumer adoption? Continue Reading …

More entries in

  1. Strategy & engagement

Discussion

No comments so far

Written By , 568 days ago

CW investments #2 – Wearables

Could getting away from screens be a trend?

There’s a dizzying variety of wearables projects on Kickstarter at the moment. Given that the Kickstarter-funded projects are outside the funding of big corporations and venture capital, it’s safe to say we’re all going to be bombarded by clever and useful wearable products over coming years.

Here’s our pick of what we found live (or recently closed) on Kickstarter. Continue Reading …

More entries in

  1. Strategy & engagement

Discussion

No comments so far

← Older Entries